Employee Issue:

Types of Discrimination

The following are the most common types of discrimination in the workplace. If you suspect you have experienced any form of workplace discrimination, fill out our free case review form to speak with an employment discrimination attorney.

Age Discrimination: The Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) prohibits employers from discriminating against job applicants and workers aged 40 or older on the basis of age. This applies to all aspects of employment including hiring, termination, promotion, pay, benefits, training and job assignments. The ADEA also protects employees who file age discrimination claims or partake in related investigations from employer retaliation.

Color or Race Discrimination: Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits employers from discriminating against potential and current employees on the basis of race and color. The federal race discrimination law also prohibits discrimination based on a common characteristic associated with a certain race, even though not all members of that race share the same characteristic.

Disability Discrimination: The Americans with Disabilities Act prohibits employers from treating a disabled but qualified worker unfavorably because of their disability. The ADA also requires employers to provide “reasonable accommodations” to disabled workers and job applicants, as long as this accommodation does not cause significant difficulty or expense for the employer.

National Origin Discrimination: Federal law prohibits employers from discriminating against an employee or job applicant on the basis of national origin. Equal employment opportunity cannot be denied because of an individual’s place of birth, culture, ancestry, association with a certain ethnic group, accent or similar characteristic.

Pregnancy Discrimination: The Pregnancy Discrimination Act prohibits employers from discriminating against employees or job applicants on the basis of pregnancy, childbirth or a related health condition. This federal law applies to companies employing 15 or more workers, including local and state governments. It also covers employment agencies, labor organizations and the federal government.

Religious Discrimination: Federal law prohibits employers from discriminating in any aspect of employment on the basis of religion. It also requires that employers make reasonable accommodations for a worker’s religious beliefs or practices. Workplace harassment based on religion is also forbidden.

Sex Discrimination: Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits employers from discriminating against job applicants and employees on the basis of sex. It also forbids an employer from segregating or classifying individuals as to deprive them of employment opportunities because of their sex.

Sexual Orientation Discrimination: Federal law does not prohibit sexual orientation discrimination in the private sector, although federal government workers are protected. However, many states, including New York, New Jersey and Massachusetts, prohibit job discrimination based on sexual orientation.

If you have experienced any form of workplace discrimination, contact an employment rights lawyer immediately. He or she can explain your employee rights and determine whether you are eligible to pursue a lawsuit. To find out if your case is valid, contact a workplace discrimination lawyer today by completing our free case review form.

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