Immigration:

Classes of Deportable Aliens

There are six general classes of deportable aliens listed in Section 237 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). They are summarized and listed below:
1. Aliens who were inadmissible at the time of entry or adjustment of status, or who have otherwise violated their status, such as those who have worked without authorization or have overstayed their time in the United States. Also included are aliens whose conditional residence status has been canceled, those who had engaged in alien smuggling and aliens who have engaged in marriage fraud.
2. Aliens who have been convicted of a crime involving moral turpitude committed within five years after the date of admission, where the maximum sentence, which could be imposed for the crime, is one year or longer, is deportable. Also, an alien who at any time after admission is convicted of two or more crimes involving moral turpitude is deportable. These deportation grounds also include aliens who are convicted of controlled substance violations (other than a single offense involving possession for one's own use of 30 grams or less of marijuana), as well as drug abusers and drug addicts, and those who have been convicted of any firearms violations. The new act also makes deportable those aliens who have been convicted of a crime involving domestic violence, stalking, or child abuse. Also, any alien who is convicted of an aggravated felony at any time after admission is deportable. An aggravated felony is described in Section 101 (a) (43) of the Immigration Act. These are crimes which the Immigration Service considers particularly serious, and which will prevent nearly all forms of relief.
3. An alien is deportable for failure to register and falsification of documents. This includes failure to register a change of address with the exception that the alien is able to establish that such failure was reasonably excusable and was not willful. This class also includes aliens with any conviction related to the use of false documents or for falsely claiming US citizenship. The exception to the latter being if each natural or adoptive parent of the alien is or was a citizen, the alien permanently resided in the United States before age 16, and the alien reasonably believed at the time of such violation that he or she was a citizen.
4. An alien may be deported for having engaged or engaging in activities relating to espionage or sabotage, threatening public safety or national security, or opposing, taking control of, or overthrowing the Government of the United States by force, violence or other unlawful means. This includes participation in terrorist activities, the Nazi persecution and genocide, commission of severe violations of religious freedom, and military-type training by a terrorist organization.
5. Any alien who becomes a public charge within five years of entry, from a cause that did not arise after entry, is deportable.
6. Any alien who has voted in violation of any Federal, State, or local law is deportable. The exception to this is if each natural or adoptive parent of the alien is or was a citizen, the alien permanently resided in the United States before age 16, and the alien reasonably believed at the time of such violation that he or she was a citizen.

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